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Thursday, June 22, 2017

Daniel Seale is appointed Governor Barbadoes

In 1624, WillamWilliams of London, draper, aged 22, deposes that on 28 February 1650 John Worsam of London, merchant, Richard Worsam of London, weaver, and Thomas Applewaite of London, merchant, signed a financial obligation to George Nash, citizen and merchant tailor of London, who has appointed Daniel Searle, Governor of Barbadoes, as his attorney. Source: Depositions and Interrogatories in the Lord Mayor's Court of London.

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Friday, June 16, 2017

The Substance of Our Roots #virginiapioneersnet


The Substance of our Roots

colonial timesPerhaps now is the time to discover our roots, who we truly are. There has been much division over the past twenty or thirty years or so as to how to establish equality among the classes. I laugh. No one is born equal or the same as others, yet we are told that there exists some kind of guarantee. Everyone is guaranteed freedom, salaries, health care, and on and on. It is the new mantra of the liberal, progressive, fascist socialist groups infiltrating our country. There are no historical facts to back up this elusion. From what I have seen of school books, true history is no longer taught. What we are getting is class division, racial hatred, and personal irresponsibility. This attitude might sell some of the population, especially dead-beats who refuse to own up and rise above problems. The least educated American children of the 19th century had stiffer requirements for grade passing and were better educated than today. A closer examination of our schools suggest a distortion of history, failure to communicate verbally and in letters, the lack of mathematical skills, and brain-washing. Multi-culturism, misquotes and mocking of the founding fathers and demanding a free ride is nothing short of preaching human beings how to fail. Therefore, it is incumbent upon this generation to research actual documents in National and State archives, old newspapers to find truth. There is a history out there which our ancestors measured their lives by. Perhaps not accounted for in the history books, but they were there as decent people, working for the American dream. Christopher Columbus did not rape the natives. He was a devout catholic who recorded in his personal journal (now translated into English) that he felt that he was on a mission from God. The old last wills and testaments and estates express the mind and will of the testator. Written accounts, receipts, inventories and sales reflect names of heirs, local ministers, neighbors and friends. The personal notes and purchases reveal a life-time of hard work and industry put into the building of local economies. Old church records produce baptisms and marriages and deaths of a community. Researching old records helps us to understand our family members, and the genetics of the past which uniquely designed future generations. Old photos and letters are another reflection of our own genetics, looks, personalities and emotions. 

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Friday, May 26, 2017

Robert Beverley, prosperous planter #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Beverley, Robert, a planter of a valuable estate, died in 1687, but his mansion was less pretentious in size and appointments. Its apartments included the chamber in which Major Beverley slept, a second overhead chamber, a porch and hall chamber, dairy and kitchen, and the overseer's room. Source: Records of Middlesex County, vol. 1698-1713, p. 113. 

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Friday, April 28, 2017

Batte, Vice-Master of Oxford University #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Batte. A brother of John and Henry Batte, sons of a Vice-Master of Oxford University in England and the first of the Batte name to remove to Virginia, was a member of the Grocers' guild in London. Source: William and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. I, p. 79. 

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Sir Robert Anderson of the Manor Pendley #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Pembroke College, Oxfordshire
Sir Robert Anderson, the lord of the manor Pendley, partly within the Parish of Tring,  left his last will and testament in Herefordshire, England (probated 8/27/1632) and bequeathed 40 shillings to "my cousin Lawrence Washington of Brasenose." Lawrence Washington was progenitor of George Washington whose forebearers migrated to Westmoreland County, Virginia. In 1625 two of her sons, Henry and Robert, attended Pembroke College. His wife was a daughter of Robert, lord Spencer, Baron of Wormleighton and owner of the manor of Althop.  Source: Immigrants, Virginia Pioneers.


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Friday, March 31, 2017

Colonel William Ball #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Ball, William, Colonel of Lancaster County died about 1693 and inserted in his will a request that his wife should teach each of their youngest children until he or she should arrive at their sixth year, after which age the youngest children were to receive instruction from their two eldest brothers. Source: Lancaster County Records, vol. 1690-1709, p. 45.

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Friday, February 24, 2017

William Baldwin in the "Plaine Joan" #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Baldwin. William Baldwin, who came in the "Plaine Joan" when he was twenty-four years of age, received three grants of land, one for 600 acres in York county, one for 67 acres in Isle of Wight, and one, in conjunction with Richard Lawrence, for 300 in Rappahannock. Source: W. A. Crozier, Virginia County Records, Vol. VI, pp. 77, 191, 281. 

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Monday, January 30, 2017

Ships Lost at Sea #virginiapioneersnet


Ships Lost at Sea

sunken shipFor 169 years vessels crossed the Atlantic into the American colonies. The adventure cost numerous lives and property and vessels went down in storms and were caught on sand bars. Some vessels bound for Virginia, for example, found it necessary to unload their cargo in the ports of New England. When General Oglethorpe engaged the first vessel to the Colony of Georgia, the captain refused to go any further south than Port Royal. Hence, its passengers had to travel by foot into Georgia. Only today through the use of sonar equipment are we realizing that thousands of vessels sank in the shipping lanes traveling their routes from Europe and the West Indies to the American ports. An examination of the deed records of Sunbury, Georgia in Liberty County reveals contracts between ship captains and colonists. The content usually specifies that if the goods do not arrive by a date certain, or if the cargo is spoilt, that the captain will not be paid. There is good reason, because the seas were frought with storms, hurricanes and sandbars. As one studies these deeds, it is quite obvious that deliveries were not always made in a timely fashion which prompted the captain to bring an offical complaint. Ultimately, the resort town of Sunbury was destroyed by a hurricane about 1800. A visit to the site is laughable. It is privately owned today and one cannot help but wonder how this remotely situated site between Charleston and Savannah housed more than 400 homes and a thriving economy. Yet the records reflect that it did. The loss of thousands of vessels during the colonial years means that the ships manifest and passenger lists also sank. This means that the collection of Immigration records at the National Archives is but a small percentage of a truer picture and it serves to emphasize the need to examine more closely "all surviving" county records from the earliest times. All of Charleston, South Carolina records are in tact, including affidavits and deeds pertaining to the affairs of the colonists. Although it is difficult to read 17th and 18th century documents, it is quite necessary, if ever we are to get to comprehend the whole picture and trace further back on the ancestors. The growing collection of Pioneer Families affords the genealogist images of actual documents, such as wills, estates, marriages, deeds, etc. A subscription is offered under 8 Genealogy Websites and includes:

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