Follow by email

For more historical tidbits about old Virginia customs and settlers, sign up to receive this free newsletter


Enter your email address:


Delivered by FeedBurner

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

About Newgate Prison in London #history #genealogy #virginiapioneers.net

Newgate Prisoners Indentured Themselves as Servants to Settle in Virginia

Newgate PrisonEnglish residents who were unable to pay their debts usually ended up in prison, with no hope of release. It was the ultimate condemnation for poor people and generally accepted by society. James Edward Oglethorpe (before he colonized Georgia) was an avid supporter of prison reform, especially after an artist friend died in Newgate. The friend was a popular artist who lived large. Oglethorpe struggled to get him released, but the artist was put into a cell with a person having a contageous disease and the artist soon died. However, Oglethorpe made his views known by pushing pamphlets and articles in various London newspapers. Ultimately, prisoners were given the choice of indenturing themselves to American colonists. Peter Coffey was born in Ireland and was apparently one of the prisoners of debt in Newgate Prison given the choice of the prison cell or the opportunity to indenture himself in the colonies. He put himself in bondage to come to America in the shipForward Galley. The voyage was made in October of 1730 and 18 years later after being released from service, he was granted 220 acres of land on Vaughans Creek.

Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
SUBSCRIBE HERE

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Typical Jamestown Home #virginiapioneers.net

Hall and Parlor House

The "Warburton House" or "Pinewoods" of about 1680 has segmental-arched openings, T-chimneys, and chimney caps with mouse-tooth brickwork, a decoration which was fashionable during the 17th century. An earlier structure also had a rear wing. The parlor and hall was probably added after the planter or tradesman had been in the colony for awhile and was more prosperous. It was a simple matter to add a "parlor" to one end of the homestead, thus making the second stage of development, the "hall-and-parlor" dwelling. In some instances, the parlor was smaller than the hall or Great Room.

Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
SUBSCRIBE HERE

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Friday, September 30, 2016

More Genealogy Information added to 8 Genealogy Websites!

Join 8 Genealogy Websites and Find your Ancestors
Lots of new records added to AL, TN, NC, KY, VA and GA!
Details www.georgiapioneers.com/subscribe/subscribe.html


Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
SUBSCRIBE HERE

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Newgate Prisoners to Virginia #history #virginiapioneers.net

Newgate Prisoners Indentured Themselves as Servants to Settle in Virginia

Newgate PrisonEnglish residents who were unable to pay their debts usually ended up in prison, with no hope of release. It was the ultimate condemnation for poor people and generally accepted by society. James Edward Oglethorpe (before he colonized Georgia) was an avid supporter of prison reform, especially after an artist friend died in Newgate. The friend was a popular artist who lived large. Oglethorpe struggled to get him released, but the artist was put into a cell with a person having a contageous disease and the artist soon died. However, Oglethorpe made his views known by pushing pamphlets and articles in various London newspapers. Ultimately, prisoners were given the choice of indenturing themselves to American colonists. Peter Coffey was born in Ireland and was apparently one of the prisoners of debt in Newgate Prison given the choice of the prison cell or the opportunity to indenture himself in the colonies. He put himself in bondage to come to America in the shipForward Galley. The voyage was made in October of 1730 and 18 years later after being released from service, he was granted 220 acres of land on Vaughans Creek.

Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
SUBSCRIBE HERE

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Lest We Forget the Age of the Statesman!

Lest We Forget the Age of the Statesman!
By Jeannette Holland Austin (Profile)

American politicans were not always liars and corrupt. If there exists a consolation to this generation, we must not forget that our country was first led by admirable men. From the time that the Virginians appeared at the First Continental Congress in Philadephia on September 2, 1763 and John Adams recorded in his diary, "The gentlemen from Virginia appear to be the most spirited and consistent of any." and before the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835, American had the greatest leaders of all time. Brilliant men who were revolutionaries paid dearly for freedom. It was not just because of such intellectually stimulating and brilliant figure as Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe and John Marshall, or the great state leaders like Peyton Randolph, Richard Bland, George Wythe and Edmund Pendleton who astounded seeded the country for greatness, but they were true statesmen: the genuises of the age.

Virginians

This inspired group of gentlemen dressed in colonial clothes sitting around a table expressing creative ideas of freedom and the means of acquiring it, even if it meant a war. Virginians were the elite planters willing to serve government and serve it well! It was the enlightened attitude of these leaders who unselfishly bore their offices and responsibilities to the people. As Thomas Jefferson put it, "eternal viligance" was required of them. Thus, the republican values of freedom were born, the common bond being land and tobacco crops which provided planters and small farmers alike the same economic interests, especially east of the Blue Ridge Mountains. So it was then that the less-affluent farmer found it to their best interest to elect prosperous neighbors to the House of Burgesses because the farmers neither had the time nor money to serve in public office. You see, the Virginian regarded public service as an honorable profession and felt deeply compelled to take care his neighbors. They served because they believed in noblesse oblige, that power and privilege accompanied responsibility. It is gravely misleading and disconcerting when writers of this modern age question the integrity of the founders. Bad writing, I would say, authorized by persons several generations removed from the truth. It was a splendid era of gentle integrity when a man's word was his "bond" and cheaters were shunned as quot;blacksheeps" Source: The Road to Independence: Virginia 1763-1783. more history

Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
SUBSCRIBE HERE

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Monday, September 5, 2016

Factoring Agents

Factoring Agents in the Olden Days
By Jeannette Holland Austin

A factor is an agent who transacts business for another. In colonial days there were tobacco and cotton factors. In other words, shipping tobacco to England, the West Indies or elsewhere, required an agent to sell the crops and handle the business transactions. In 1672, one of the factors of George Lee, an English merchant, died in Virginia. At the time he was indebted to his principal for 700 pounds sterling. His property was passed into the hands of his mother who appointed an attorney to take charge of it. The whole estate was converted into tobacco, a crop which he was about to ship to his own consignee in England. The General Court interposed with an order requiring him to transfer the entire quantity to a third person in the mother country until the justice of the claim of Lee onn the property of his deceased agent had been decided. Also, all of his account books went back to England. As was the common practice, widows had plenty of suitors owing to a shortage of females in the Virginia colony. This is how the goods of an estate went into the hands of the second husband who very often showed no scruple in dealing with them as his personal property. Such was the case of Thomas Kingston, the agent of Thomas Cowell who owned a plantation in the colony about 1636. Upon the death of Kingston, his relict became the wife of Thomas Loving who appropriated the credits and merchandise of Cowell. Cowell petitioned that Loving be required to take an inventory of the property in his possession and to give bond in a large sum to hold it without further purloining it.
#georgiapioneers.com
#virginiapioneers.net
#southcarolinapioneers.net
#kentuckypioneers.com
#northcarolinapioneers.com
#southeasterngenealogy.com
#genealogy-books.com

Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
SUBSCRIBE HERE

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Battle of the Wilderness #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet #history

Battle of the Wilderness, May 5-7, 1864
Battle of the Wilderness
This battle occurred in Spotsylvania and Orange Counties and was the first battle of the overland campaign of Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant against Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Grant attempted to move quickly through the dense underbrush of the Wilderness of Spotsylvania, but Lee intercepted him on the parallel road. On the morning of May 5, the Union V Corps under Major General Gouverneur K. Warren attacked the Confederate Second Corps on the Orange Turnpike. But that afternoon the Third Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General A. P. Hill, encountered Brigadier General George W. Getty and Major General Winfield S. Hancock on the Orange Plank Road. Fighting until dark was fierce but inconclusive as both sides attempted to maneuver in the dense woods.

May 6th. Hancock drove back Hill's corps at dawn on the Plank Road, but the First Corps of Lieutenant General James Longstreet arrived in time to prevent the collapse of the Confederate right flank. Longstreet followed up with a surprise flanking attack from an unfinished railroad bed driving Hancock back to the Brock Road, but the momentum was lost when Longstreet was wounded by his own men. An evening attack by Brigadier General John B. Gordon against the Union right flank caused consternation at Union headquarters, but the lines stabilized and fighting ceased. On May 7th, Grant disengaged and moved to the southeast, intending to leave the Wilderness to interpose his army between Lee and Richmond, leading to the bloody Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. Both armies suffered heavy casualties, a harbinger of a bloody war of attrition by Grant against Lee's army and, eventually, the Confederate capital, Richmond, Virginia. The battle was tactically inconclusive, as Grant disengaged and continued his offensive. 

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers

arrow Become a Members

Need to know if your ancestors left a will or estate record?  An easy, quick (and free) way to find out is to click on the links below.
arrow

County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee



Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

Membership to 8 Genealogy Websites - Reoccurring subscription with guaranteed low rate

REOCCURRING SUBSCRIPTION WITH PAYPAL = $150 per year. Guaranteed low rate so long as your subscription continues to renew itself. You may unsubscribe at any time, however, to prevent the reoccurring charge, you must "cancel" before the renewal date. To do this, login to your PayPal account and select the cancel option.
About your password. Please allow up to 2 hours for your password. If not received in a timely manner, click to send reminder
FIND VIRGINIA ANCESTORS NOW!

Virginia Databases

View Images online

Join this blog for more interesting information about the first patriots to Virginia whose sacrifices and actions led a path to the freedom which ultimately resulted in the American Dream.

Join Join Virginia Pioneers and read old wills on line. Easy

"Virginia Historical Videos"
"Find your Ancestors on Virginia Pioneers.net"
Follow us via Email
Enter your email address:


Delivered by FeedBurner



Do the Magic Centipede


click here for video