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Saturday, September 30, 2017

James Burton of New England #virginiapioneersnet #virginiagenealogy

Burton, James. There is a letter in Lancaster County from Captain James Burton of New England which reflects the attitude of the merchants trading with Virginia planters. He urges his correspondent, acting as his attorney, to secure a cargo of tobacco, hides, and pork for the market in Barbados, to be purchased with commodities already in his hands, and with good which Barton would dispatch in his own ketch, now about to sail for Virginia. While the vessel was absent on the voyage to and from the West Indies, the second destination point, the attorney was to make a further collection of hides, which, with tobacco, was to be shipped directly to Holland. This measure served as evidence that the merchants of New England openly evaded the injunctions of the Navigation Act. Source: Records of Lancaster County, vol.1666-1682, p. 440; Economic History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century by Philip Alexander Bruce. 

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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Sir James Calthorpe #virginiapioneersnet #virginiagenealogy

Calthrope. Sir James Calthorpe had a grandson who settled in the Colony. There were several connections. A cousin, Reynolds Calthorpe had married the only daughter of Viscount Longueville. Through his mother, who was a daughter of John Bacon of Herset in Norfolk, Christopher Calthorpe of Virginia was related to the Bacon family. Source: William and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. II, p. 107. 

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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

The Value of Tithables in Genealogy

VirginiaPioneers.net has just added images of wills and estates in Accomack County, Virginia, 1671 to 1737.  Also, marriage bonds and licenses 1784 to 1798. And Tithables 1674 to 1694. The reason to search Tithables is because in colonial Virginia the General Assembly collected a poll tax on all free males, servants and slaves. The information in those records help to affirm the presence of your ancestors and the numbers of persons in his family. To see a list of other Virginia records please go to Virginia Pioneers





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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The Story of Old Rappahannock County #virginiapioneers #genealogy

Rappahannock County was founded in 1656 from part of Lancaster County. Many of the first colonists resided in this vicinity; however, the old county became extinct in 1692 when it was separated from Essex and Richmond Counties.  Later, 1833, this name was used again.
Genealogists may get confused, since the newer county records did not begin until 1833.  However, the indexes to deeds, wills, estates and settlements in the Old County dating from 1664 to1682 do exist and are posted on Virginia Pioneers  Also, some miscellaneous wills dug out of the old records are here.  While researching Essex County, one should also research Old Rappahannock, as the same families resided in the general vicinity.





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Monday, July 31, 2017

Giles Brent #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Brent. George Brent, one of the largest landowners in the Northern Neck of Virginia, was a grandson of Sir John Peyton of Doddington. His wife was a niece of Sir William Layton of Horsmandene in Worcestershire. Source: Waters' Gleanings, pp. 447-448. 

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Reading Colonial Script #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Colonial Script is a Lost Art



Colonial Handwriting


The task of interpreting the handwriting of our ancestors during the 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th centuries can be troublesome. However, cursive writing began to change dramatically during the 20th century, and today, has no design to it whatsoever. It is simply a sloppy scribbling of choice. One can use a chart to discern letters in the colonial hand-writing, but try and read a 20th century death certificate! Without structure, then, we seem to be losing our interpretative skills. Hence, the skills of the past are being lost in the 21st century. I personally spend many long hours trying to read the script of yesterday. It is important to me to intepret the old records because those people are my ancestors. They were fluent in Latin, French and English, and their verbage and writing styles reflect an education and skills far superior than what we have today. If you do not believe me, read the old wills and inventories of the colonial estates which reflect a massive effort of building communities around their farms and promoting supportive economies of farm stores and trades. Such a reading is helpful in understanding the work which was required to build a new country out of wilderness terrain. 
See images of old Shenandoah County VA Wills, Estates, etc.

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Virginia Genealogy Databases

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Other Places to Discover the Earliest Land Grants in Virginia #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Sometimes one discovers Colonial Virginia Land Grants in the County Records.  They are usually found in the earliest books entitled Wills, Deeds, Estates, etc. which are published together. One has to read each page to discover a particular record.  Charles City County published some very interesting deeds beginning in 1655 and lists of people who received land grants.  As I said, one must dig, page by page. If you are searching for an immigrant who is not listed in the Book of Emigrants, or other Virginia land grant books, it may be worth the while to read the whole record.  Granted, 17th century writing is difficult to read. Here is a Chart which will help you to read old script



Become a Member of Virginia Pioneers and Find your Ancestors
Virginia Genealogy Databases

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Includes Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

1-year subscription - $150

Note: This subscription renews itself annually. When you are ready to cancel, to avoid further fees, please cancel (online) with Paypal in advance of the renewal date.


Bundle and Save!