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Monday, October 8, 2018

Sprinkle Vinegar About the Cabin #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Sprinkle Vinegar About the Cabin 

barrelsShips transporting emigrants a path between Europe and America. The vessels were small and crowded, the cabins close, and the voyage required from six to ten weeks. "Betwixt decks," writes a colonist, "there can hardly a man fetch his breath by reason there ariseth such a funke in the night that it causeth putrifacation of the blood and breedeth disease much like the plague." After William Penn came to America and his ship lost a third of its passengers by 

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Saturday, October 6, 2018

Genealogy Help

Now may be the time for you to join Virginia Pioneers.net !  More genealogy database has been added to Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia - all accessibl with the same password under "Georgia Pioneers".  The largest addition by far is the Genealogy Vault which includes 3000+ traced families and Special Collections!

An extra available service to members (expires soon) is that I will personally research (FREE) the ancestor which whom you are experiencing the most problems and afterwards share it on the website to that others working on the same lineage may contact you and/or share their information.  To take advantage, join below.




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Thursday, September 20, 2018

About John Yeargain of Charlottesville

John Yeargain

John Yeargain, a resident of Charlottesville since about 1790, was born in a small village four miles from Hampton. From the time of his youth, he enjoyed the game of catch and keep. The object was that if anything valuable was within his grasp, he possessed it. He continued playing the game when he became an adult. As a result, he became wealthy and "sometimes boasting exhibits the first four-pence half penny that was ever in his possession." Ultimately, he shunned his neighbors and and began buying and selling whiskey, which became his primary employment. After residing in different parts of the village, he purchased a home near the court house   . . . more . . .

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Monday, August 13, 2018

Tippling Houses in Colonial Virginia #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy


Tippling Houses

Virginians brewed peach and apple brandies, described as Virginia drams, however, there were certain restrictions. These brandies were to be sold within the rates laid down for English spirits. 

Jamestown FerriesHowever, permission was granted to keepers of ordinaries to secure as large a profit from the sale of beer as they could make within a limit of four shillings a gallon, or forty pounds of tobacco. This was a very high price in those days. To make things worse, although innkeepers charged at established prices, for many years their accounts were not been pleadable. The right to sue upon these accounts in a court of justice and recover judgment was not granted until 1668. But the requirement was that the action be brought within a year after the debt was contracted. There were so many taverns and tippling houses in the colony during 1668 that the number was reduced in each county to one or two, unless they could accommodate travellers. More were needed at ports, ferries and the crossings of great roads. It seems that every court house was also a drinking-shop! During the high time of the rebellion of Nathaniel Bacon against the local government, many laws were passed (1676) for the purpose of suppressing long-standing abuses, and a legislative attempt was made to enforce what amounted to general prohibition. Thus, the licenses of all inns, alehouses and tippling-houses (except those at James City and at the two great ferries of the York River) were revoked! Source: Hening's Statues, vol. II, p. 113. 

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Monday, August 6, 2018

Skirmish between the Virginia Militia and the British during the War of 1812


Skirmish between the Virginia Militia and the British during the War of 1812

Farnham ChurchFew people remember that during October of 1814, a force of British troops came up the Coan River and marched to Heathsville. Thrn proceeded to march up through the Neck to Richmond where they pillaged, burned and destroyed. Upon reaching the North Farnham Church, County, a skirmish was fought between the raiders and the Virginia militia, leaving bullet holes in the walls of the church to mark the battle. 

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Monday, July 30, 2018

Learn if your Virginia Ancestors Lert a Will or Estate in Virginia #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Learn if your Ancestors Left a Will in Virginia


Old Colonial Records, Wills, Estates
SAVE TIME!  Visit the link listed below to learn if any of your ancestors left wills or estates in Virginia 

Use this Virginia County Index to Find Ancestors










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Monday, July 23, 2018

Colonial Dress #virginiapioneersnet #vawills #vaestates #vamarriages #vagenealogy #vaancestors

Colonial Dress

colonialdressShoe buckles were worn manufactured of brass, steel or silver. The periwig was worn during the latter part of the 17th century. In 1689, William Byrd sent one of his wigs to his London merchant with instructions to have it altered. The covering of heads of men consisted of the monmouth cap, the felt, the beaver or caster and the sraw hat. The neck-cloth was of blue linen, calico dowlas, muslan or the finest holland. The band or falling collar was made either of linen omore...Clarke Co. VA Names of Ancestorsr lace. The material of the coat ranged from broadcloth, camlet, fustian drugget and serve to cotton, kersey, frieze, canvas and buckskin. In 1638 a pair of boots in Accomac were valued at forty pounds of tobacco.





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