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Friday, July 21, 2017

Names of Earliest Settlers to Essex County VA on this Map #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Names of Earliest Settlers on this Map 

Map of First Plantations in Essex CountyThis map depicts the locations of the first settlers to Essex County, viz: Dangerfield, Layton, Payne, Garnet, Smith, Lowry, Young, Hill and Bowler. Tappahannock was a large community of these settlers. Henry Aubrey established his plantation on Hodgkins Creek (later Hoskins Creek) where he raised hogs, cattle and sheep. Upon his death in 1694, he left much of the cattle to servants, and 700 acres to his son, Richard Aubrey on Hodgkins Creek. He lived the typical life of a planter in Essex County, of feather beds, fine linen and a silver tankard which he bequeathed to his wife. Also, there were orchard buildings to accommodate fruit crops. 

The images of the earliest wills are available to members of Virginia Pioneers Also, the Wills and Estates probated from 1692 to 1695 were the following first settlers: Henry Awbrey, Elizabeth Browne, Thomas Cooper, Richard Holt, Martin Johnson, John Jones, Thomas Pettit, Griffin Roberts, John Smith, John Waters and Thomas Williamson. More Wills and Estates were recently added dating from 1717 to 1721; 1722 to 1730. 

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Thursday, July 20, 2017

Genealogy Records in AL GA KY NC SC TN VA - Subscribe today!


Georgia Pioneers.com is pleased to announce the addition of genealogy databases and images in the States of : Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Included are wills, estates, bibles, cemeteries, pensions, obituaries, and more.  To subscribe now click on the link below (or copy it into your browser)


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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Friday, June 30, 2017

Muscovado Sugar #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Byrd, William.  In a vessel which left Barbados in 1661, the Charles of Southton, there were among the consignments for Virginia, six hogsheads of bay salt.  In some instances these consignments were restricted to sugar, rum and molasses.  How large they were is illustrated in the case of William Byrd.  On one occasion Byrd obtained from this island 1200 gallons of rum, 5000 pounds of muscovado sugar, three tons of molasses, 200 pounds of ginger and one case of lime-juice.  Source: Records of Lancaster County, vol. 1666-1682, p. 31; Records of Rappahannock County vol. 1656-1664, p. 274.


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Monday, June 26, 2017

Historical Beginning of William and Mary College #virginiapioneersnet

Dr. James Blair and William and Mary College

William and MaryA Scotch ecclesiastic by the name of Dr. James Blair, Commissioner of the Established Church and member of the Council whose dream it was to erect a college raised a fairly large sum in promised subscriptions before sailing to England where he collected more. Tillotson, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Stillingfleet, Bishop of Worcester, helped him in this endeavor. Also, the King and Queen inclined a favorable ear, and, though he met with opposition in certain quarters, Blair at last obtained a Charter for the erection of a college in Virginia which would be sustained by taxation. Thus, he sailed to Virginia with the charter in hand and a plan to construct "a seminary of ministers of the gospel where youths may be piously educated in good letters and manners; a certain place of universal study, or perpetual college of divinity, philosophy, languages and other good arts and sciences." Virginians were anxious to educate their sons, therefore, the Assembly of Virginia, for the benefit of the college, taxed raw and tanned hides, dressed buckskin, skins of doe and elk, muskrat and raccoon. The construction of the new seat of learning was begun at Williamsburg. When it was completed and opened to students, it was named William and Mary College. Its name and record shine fair in old Virginia. Colonial worthies in goodly number were educated at William and Mary, as were later revolutionary soldiers and statesmen, and men of name and fame in the United States. Three American Presidents, viz: Jefferson, Monroe, and Tyler were trained there, as well as Marshall, the Chief Justice, four signers of the Declaration of Independence, and many another man of mark. In the year 1704, just over a decade since Dr. Blair had obtained the charter for his College, the erratic and able Governor of Virginia, Francis Nicholson, was recalled. For all that he was a wild talker, he had on the whole done well for Virginia. He was, as far as is known, the first person actually to propose a federation or union of all those English-speaking political divisions, royal provinces, dominions, palatinates, or what not, that had been hewed away from the vast original Virginia. He did what he could to forward the movement for education and the fortunes of the William and Mary College. But he is quoted as having on one occasion informed the body of the people that "the gentlemen imposed upon them." Again, he is said to have remarked of the servant population that they had all been kidnapped and had a lawful action against their masters. "Sir," he stated to President Blair, who would have given him advice from the Bishop of London, "Sir, I know how to govern Virginia and Maryland better than all the bishops in England! If I had not hampered them in Maryland and kept them under, I should never have been able to govern them!" To which Blair had to say, "Sir, if I know anything of Virginia, they are a good-natured, tractable people as any in the world, and you may do anything with them by way of civility, but you will never be able to manage them in that way you speak of, by hampering and keeping them under!" *

* William and Mary College Quarterly, vol. I, p. 66. 

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Thursday, June 22, 2017

Daniel Seale is appointed Governor Barbadoes

In 1624, WillamWilliams of London, draper, aged 22, deposes that on 28 February 1650 John Worsam of London, merchant, Richard Worsam of London, weaver, and Thomas Applewaite of London, merchant, signed a financial obligation to George Nash, citizen and merchant tailor of London, who has appointed Daniel Searle, Governor of Barbadoes, as his attorney. Source: Depositions and Interrogatories in the Lord Mayor's Court of London.

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Friday, June 16, 2017

The Substance of Our Roots #virginiapioneersnet


The Substance of our Roots

colonial timesPerhaps now is the time to discover our roots, who we truly are. There has been much division over the past twenty or thirty years or so as to how to establish equality among the classes. I laugh. No one is born equal or the same as others, yet we are told that there exists some kind of guarantee. Everyone is guaranteed freedom, salaries, health care, and on and on. It is the new mantra of the liberal, progressive, fascist socialist groups infiltrating our country. There are no historical facts to back up this elusion. From what I have seen of school books, true history is no longer taught. What we are getting is class division, racial hatred, and personal irresponsibility. This attitude might sell some of the population, especially dead-beats who refuse to own up and rise above problems. The least educated American children of the 19th century had stiffer requirements for grade passing and were better educated than today. A closer examination of our schools suggest a distortion of history, failure to communicate verbally and in letters, the lack of mathematical skills, and brain-washing. Multi-culturism, misquotes and mocking of the founding fathers and demanding a free ride is nothing short of preaching human beings how to fail. Therefore, it is incumbent upon this generation to research actual documents in National and State archives, old newspapers to find truth. There is a history out there which our ancestors measured their lives by. Perhaps not accounted for in the history books, but they were there as decent people, working for the American dream. Christopher Columbus did not rape the natives. He was a devout catholic who recorded in his personal journal (now translated into English) that he felt that he was on a mission from God. The old last wills and testaments and estates express the mind and will of the testator. Written accounts, receipts, inventories and sales reflect names of heirs, local ministers, neighbors and friends. The personal notes and purchases reveal a life-time of hard work and industry put into the building of local economies. Old church records produce baptisms and marriages and deaths of a community. Researching old records helps us to understand our family members, and the genetics of the past which uniquely designed future generations. Old photos and letters are another reflection of our own genetics, looks, personalities and emotions. 

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More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers



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